Recycled Flint Cores as Teaching Tools: Flintknapping at Archaeological Open-Air Museums | EXARC

Recycled Flint Cores as Teaching Tools: Flintknapping at Archaeological Open-Air Museums | EXARC
— Read on exarc.net/issue-2016-3/at/recycled-flint-cores-teaching-tools-flintknapping-archaeological-open-air-museums

Great idea and ideal for summer schools and Outreach fun. @oda_outreach @cosmmout

Setting up (or finding) a YAC group

A YAC (Young Archaeologists’ Club) is an exciting prospect – getting youngsters involved with what is seen to be an older person’s game.
Seeing faces as they participate as groups to explore practical archaeology and take it through to a finished project involvement.
Learning and practicing skills from First Aid to careful lifting and working with others on the same learning path with the same interests.

https://www.yac-uk.org/userfiles/leadersareadownloads/Setting_up_a_new_YAC_branch_NOV2017.pdf

BBC Wales – a brief outline of Offa’s Dyke

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/history/sites/themes/periods/dark_ages03.shtml

Rather a generous outline when considering the worst aspect of Anglo-Saxon colonialism, power-demarcation and metaphors in the landscape.

A beautiful place to visit and walk/cycle/run/drive alongside or stay at one of the many hostels along the route of this, the biggest linear earthwork monument in the UK (2nd largest in Europe).

New in IA52: The social organisation of metalworking in southern England during the Beaker period and Bronze Age

From: Judith Winters
Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2019 at 14:45
Subject: New in IA52: The social organisation of metalworking in southern England during the Beaker period and Bronze Age
To: <ARCH-THEORY>

New in IA52

The social organisation of metalworking in southern England during the Beaker period and Bronze Age: absence of evidence or evidence of absence?

by Chris Carey, Andy M. Jones, Michael J Allen and Gill Juleff

https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.52.4

This article attempts to consider the social dimensions of metalworking during the Beaker period and Bronze Age in southern England. However, any attempt to discuss the social context of metalworking in these periods, i.e. who was working metals and where these activities occurred, is confronted with an extremely low evidence base of excavated archaeological sites where metalworking is known to have taken place. This lack of data and subsequent understanding of metalworking locations stands in stark contrast to the thousands of Beaker and Bronze Age metal artefacts housed in museum archives across Britain. These metal artefacts bear witness to the ability of people in Beaker and Bronze Age societies in Britain, and particularly southern England, to obtain, transform and use metals since the introduction of copper at c.2450 BC. Such metal artefacts have been subject to detailed analytical programmes, which have revealed information on the supply and recycling of metals. Likewise, there have also been significant advances in our understanding of the prehistoric mining of metals across the British Isles, with Beaker and Bronze Age mines identified in locations such as Ross Island (Ireland), the Great Orme (UK) and Alderley Edge (UK). Consequently, there is detailed archaeological knowledge about the two ends of the metalworking spectrum: the obtaining of the metal ores from the ground and the finished artefacts. However, the evidence for who was working metals and where is almost completely lacking.

This article discusses the archaeological evidence of the location of metalworking areas in these periods and dissects the reasons why so few have been found within archaeological excavation, with the evidence for early metallurgy likely to be slight and ambiguous, and possibly not identifiable as metalworking remains during excavation. Suggestions are made as to where such metalworking activities could have taken place in the Beaker period and Bronze Age, and what techniques can be applied to discover some of this evidence of metalworking activity, to allow access to the social dimensions of early metalworking and metalworkers.

Judith

Judith Winters
Editor, Internet Archaeology
Web: http://intarch.ac.uk
Twitter: @IntarchEditor
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/internet.archaeology

Department of Archaeology, University of York YO1 7EP, UK +44 (0)1904 323955

Arch%20signature%20athena%20swann.png

My working days are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

EMAIL DISCLAIMER http://www.york.ac.uk/docs/disclaimer/email.htm

Archaeology podcasts …

A great way to catch up on archaeological news and discussions is via podcasts.

You can safely listen to the podcasts while driving, digging, walking, chilling or writing reports/PhD’s, etc.

The Archaeology Podcast network (https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/archaeology/) is not only good listening but good for news and catch-ups – even if you don’t agree with it all Chris Webster is particularly good listening and experienced in Podcasting – running podcast tuition too.

Watch for the CoSMM and Offa’s Dyke Association Outreach podcasts coming soon

The Essay – Anglo-Saxon Portraits – Offa, King of the Mercians

Professor Thomas Charles-Edwards discusses Offa, King of Mercia from 757 to 796 AD


— Read on www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/b01pz17l

A podcast from the BBC on Offa – king of the Mercians and reputedly responsible for Offa’s Dyke – the second biggest earthwork in Europe. @CoSMMOut

Bibliography: